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Joanne Lee's Pam Flett Press independent serial publication will heading to the 'Libidinal circuits and the city' conference in Liverpool: she will be presenting a paper entitled 'City constellations: essaying the urban everyday through the Pam Flett Press'.

'Libidinal Circuits: Scenes of Urban Innovation III' is the third annual conference of the International Association for the Study of the Culture of Cities; it runs 8-10 July 2015. Find more information via the website at http://www.libidinalcircuits.com and via FACT

Published in Joanne Lee
Joanne Lee is participating in a closing event for the '37 pieces of flair' exhibition/project at NewBridge Project Space, Newcastle on Friday 16th January from 6-8pm
'Disconnected Paragraphs: Friends reunited & a daily dose of democratic material or sweetshop toxicity' asks: How can friendship support us in effecting change? In our time, inequality is growing whilst advertising continues to create unsustainable wants, mental health is treated as an individual rather than a political problem, creative culture is increasingly gentrified, and education is instrumentalised towards the needs of corporate interests: given such overwhelming problems, how can friendship support us in shaping alternatives?
You can read the essays from which this event will draw online at http://www.lloyd-wilson.co.uk/website%20pdf/37_Pieces_Newspaper.pdf
The NewBridge Project presents 37 pieces of flair, a group exhibition and series of events that will examine the social and cultural context of mental health. http://thenewbridgeproject.com/37-pieces-of-flair/
Published in Shout

The Pam Flett Press is an independent serial exploring the aesthetics of everyday life. Words and pictures by Joanne Lee. Designed by dust

'Gumming up the works' features a spoken word essay, listenable/downloadable from Soundcloud. (If you prefer to read rather than listen, you can download/print a pdf transcript of the recording here.)

This third issue fantasizes about luminous constellations of dropped chewing gum on the street, confronts a horrible compulsion to seek out the hard stuff glued under desks or in the recesses of train carriages, before finding itself fixated upon various species of lumps, heaps and piles; ultimately the writing explores creative work as a sort of digestion or composting, and suggests we have quite a lot to learn from worms. 

The essay, which runs to just under an hour of listening time, is accompanied by a printed publication featuring 26000 words of excessive, digressive footnotes (about lichen, large format photography, islands, creative block, binary erotics, fiddling, getting side-tracked, stickiness, shit, disgust, using animals to think with, the Katamari Damacy computer game, tumbleweed methodology, hoarding, clutter, impropriety, rubbish...) the generation of which have become the point of the exercise... 

The print publication comes with a postcard and 10 full colour photographic images. It was selected as one of the best books by European artists for the exhibition/fair KALEID London 2014.

Published in Joanne Lee

During September 2014, Joanne Lee participated in an exhibition 'Distractions' at the Castle, Walthamstow, London, along with NTU Fine Art graduates Rachel Fox and Samuel Mercer, and artist Gisli Bergmann. The term ‘distraction’ is loaded with associations: it is complex and confusing, at times contradictory.

'Distractions' sees artists and writers engaged in a conversation about the nature of distractions...Set within a busy East End pub, The Castle creates an unusual space for both art and dialogue. 

Two illustrated publications were available free of charge, for people to browse within the pub and to take home.


Published in Shout
Joanne Lee is delighted to announce that 'Gumming up the works', issue #3 of her independent serial publication the Pam Flett Press, has been selected for KALEID London 2014 a major annual juried exhibition showcasing the best European-based artists books. 
 
The event, organised by KALEID editions focuses on the form of the book as an interdisciplinary activity, combining visual arts with traditional book arts, contemporary ideas and new technology; it features drawing, printmaking, art writing, photography, painting, sculpture, book arts, video, digital media, installation, participatory and performance work.
 
The Pam Flett Press serial is the main method and outcome for Lee's current research through practice. It is increasingly being recognised as a productive model for research and publishing: she has been invited to speak about the Press at Loughborough University's Researcher Essentials: Publishing and how to get Published, an event intended to support postgraduate research students and early-career researchers (17 June, 1-5pm) 
Published in Shout

Joanne Lee has an essay entitled Nine Rather Disconnected Paragraphs: on mental health, capitalism, creative education and the politics of friendship in a new publication from curatorial duo Lloyd-Wilson. You can read it online here.

It forms part of '37 pieces of flair' a 3 part season of arts and cinema starting with film screenings at The Star and Shadow Cinema, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, followed by a publication launch and concluding with an exhibition and events programme at The NewBridge Project, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Unlike other mental health themed film seasons or exhibitions, '37 pieces of flair' will focus its attention less upon the individual stories of enduring mental health problems and rather take a step back in an attempt to grasp a broader look at, or investigation of, the society and its culture from which they emerge. For more info see http://thenewbridgeproject.com/tag/37-pieces-of-flair/

Joanne Lee is participating in a closing event for the  '37 pieces of flair' exhibition/project at NewBridge Project Space, Newcastle on Friday 16th January from 6-8pm.

'Disconnected Paragraphs: Friends reunited & a daily dose of democratic material or sweetshop toxicity' asks: How can friendship support us in effecting change? In our time, inequality is growing whilst advertising continues to create unsustainable wants, mental health is treated as an individual rather than a political problem, creative culture is increasingly gentrified, and education is instrumentalised towards the needs of corporate interests: given such overwhelming problems, how can friendship support us in shaping alternatives?

 
Published in Joanne Lee

The Pam Flett Press is an independent serial exploring the aesthetics of everyday life. Words and pictures by Joanne Lee. Designed by dust.

The first issue 'Call yourself a bloody professional' adapts an album cover aphorism from The Fall as its title and is something of a manifesto for the rest of the series. It begins with trying to avoid getting a proper job and recognises that the amateur does things out of love rather than professional necessity. 

Readers will also find extensive discussion of curiosity and careers, carrier bags and colanders, a consideration of the distinctions between amateur and professional wankers, as well as an engagement with experts and epistemophilia... Francophiles will enjoy name-checking those who’ve inspired this endeavour: Roland Barthes, Michel de Certeau, Michel Foucault, Michel de Montaigne, Georges Perec, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Agnes Varda. Northerners will know that none of this could have happened without Mark. E. Smith and the mighty Fall.

Published in Joanne Lee

Joanne Lee participated as one of four ‘Seers in Residence’ responding to Traci Kelly’s monoprint installation Feeling It For You (Perspective)

The installation formed half of From Where I Am I Can See You, alongside works by Rita Marhaug, and was exhibited through January in Nottingham Trent University’s Bonington Gallery.

The Seers in Residence programme engages four researchers from NTU: Emma CockerBen JuddSimon Cross and Joanne Lee to respond according their own research and practice. Some documentation of Joanne Lee at work appears here thanks to Julian Hughes

Working with photography and text this project developed ideas begun in issue 2 of the independent serial publication Pam Flett Press and in a residency at the former Spode factory in Stoke-on-Trent where Lee considered Yukio Mishima’s articulation (in Sun and Steel) of ‘the profundity of the surface itself’ and historian Joseph Amato's assertion that, in order to understand modernity and our present, we ought ‘to concentrate on surfaces’. 

Images and texts from Traci Kelly and the four Seers appear in Feeling It For You (Perspective) with Seers in Residence, published by Bonington Gallery / Nottingham Trent University. Emma Cocker's introductory text 'Stepping Towards Stepping Away' begins: 'Within a research culture that often privileges the distinction of one’s research from others, what place is there for the building of bridges? Beyond the realm of institutional collaboration and network bids, what does it really mean to construct spaces for speculation, for sharing ideas, for thinking together?' 

 

Published in Joanne Lee

Emma Cocker & her collaborator Clare Thornton (a participant in the NTU Fine Art Summer Lodge) have a new exhibition at project space plus in Lincoln from 3rd November.

You are invited to the launch event and reading on 11th November - booking advised via http://theitalici.eventbrite.co.uk

The Italic I is a collaborative interdisciplinary project by Emma Cocker and Clare Thornton, comprising new sculptural, time-based and textual works for exhibition, animated by a series of live events. Within The Italic I, Cocker and Thornton approach the gallery as gymnasium, a training space for exploring the different states of potential made possible through voluntarily surrendering to the event of a repeated fall. The Italic I involves an attempt to slow and extend the duration of falling in order to suspend and elaborate upon its discrete phases or scenes, which in turn sheds light on the process of artistic collaboration itself and the making of meaning within creative labour.

“We are seeking new vocabularies for reflecting on the labour within artistic practice. We address states of ‘not knowing’ within the creative process, focusing on the act of collaboration itself as a site of desirable negotiation. We are striving to find the means for speaking about the experience of practice, wrestling with the idea of what it is to collaborate. The motif of the fall becomes the foil through which to reflect on the undisclosed, unnamed, or even invisible episodes within artistic endeavour, the various tipping points between thinking and action. Falling. Artistic Labour. Over and over, beginning again and again, repeating gestures, not for the perfection of a given move but rather moves towards deeper understanding”.

 

Event Programme

In the second week of exhibition, The Italic I will be animated by a series of live events including live performance actions. a performance reading and publication launch, and a reading group. The artists will also be working in the space at specific times.

 

Launch Event + Performance Reading

Tuesday 11 November

17.30 – 19.30, 18.00 Performance Reading

In conjunction with their exhibition The Italic I at project space plus, Cocker and Thornton have produced an artists’ publication, which they will also present in the form of a performance reading. Booking advised.  http://theitalici.eventbrite.co.uk

 

Reading Group

Tuesday 11 November

11.00 – 12.00

Cocker and Thornton will host a reading group focusing on extracts from Erin Manning’s, Relationscapes: Movement, Art and Philosophy (2012) as a means for generating discussion around the ideas and concerns relating to their current exhibition. Booking advised. http://theitalici-readinggroup.eventbrite.co.uk 

 

The Italic I is supported through funding by the Arts Council of England - Grants for the Arts.

Published in Shout

The Pam Flett Press is an independent serial exploring the aesthetics of everyday life. Words and pictures by Joanne Lee. Designed by dust

Issue #2 'Lord Biro and the writing on the wall' is all about misreadings and willful misunderstandings: it explores curious characters encountered on various city streets as well as the names people are given, or (sometimes) choose to go by, before digressing into the unexpected poetry of tagging and abstract paintings on city walls. 

The concertina companion of footnotes starts to get a little out of hand, with many entries spawning notes of their own, and some of these generating still further annotation... Amongst these you’ll find a disquisition on the naming of colours, consideration of the biro’s invention and use, a list of recording artistes whose names claim spurious nobility, thoughts on archaeology, the different knowledge made possible by practice, and Hans Magnus Enzensberger on contradiction in essays.

Published in Joanne Lee